Projection of Lines – I (Inclined to only one plane)

Projection of Lines inclined to only one plane

   
 

First assume the

simplest position a line occupies in space

Parallel to both the planes HP and VP

The line has true length in both the front and top views.

   
 

(i)     If the line is inclined only to HP

the Front view is a line having the true length (TL) and

true inclination θ

(Note: the top view
is foreshortened)

   
 

(ii)    If the line is inclined only to VP

the Top view is a line having the true length (TL) and

true inclination Φ

(Note: the front view
is foreshortened)

   
 

Wish you a Happy drawing

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25 responses to “Projection of Lines – I (Inclined to only one plane)

  1. girish gopal agrawal

    This site is ideal for studying projection of lines

  2. Thanks. Please Show a sketch, if the line is inclined on both the planes. for eg, 40mm length inclined60 degree to Hp & 45 degree to Vp.

  3. Dear Harry,
    please refer the post named Projections of straight lines II (inclined to both planes) you can even download the power point presentation

  4. A plate having a shape of an isoceles triangle has base 50mm and altitude 70mm. It is so placed that in the front view it seen as an equilateral triangle of 50mm side and one side is inclined at 45 deg to xy .please give the ans at the earliest.

  5. pleace make your drawing steps clear.

  6. I think the above steps are clear. any way try it with some numerical values for example, line AB measures 90mm and makes 35 degrees with HP and parallel to VP.
    well the steps are

    i) first assume the line parallel to both planes
    therefore the line should be drawn as a parallel line to XY(reference line)
    ii) now rotate the line in VP (front view) to 35 degrees so that it will have the true length and true inclination
    iii) project the front view to the bottom to get top view(please note now the top view is having foreshortened length i.e., less than true length)
    wish you a happy drawing

  7. How to get true inclinations with HP and VP? Also have doubht in drawing the traces

    • Dear Balu,
      Just reverse the process mentioned in the lines inclined to both planes.
      first plot the projections from the conditions given
      draw locus on the all the four points in front and top view.
      rotate the front view to other locus and extend it to the corresponding point locus in the top view.
      this new point and the other end in the top view gives you true length and the angle is true inclination.

  8. a 90 mm long line is parallal to and 25 mm in front of v.p. its one end is in hp. while the other is 50 mm above the h.p. draw the projection and find its inclination with the v.p.

  9. Projection of lines

  10. Its all full of time waste for new students at you are welcomes screen how can new students know whats the H.P & V.P mean.

  11. Dont be too brief,hard 2 undrstand!

  12. ya this was short and was very easy way to understand thank u for your great job it was very useful for me

  13. I have a lot of problem with engineering drawing.
    I am unable to solve problems on lines.
    What can I do.
    Please give me some useful suggestions.

  14. Pingback: 2010 in review | Engineering Graphics

  15. sir please give me a ppt for engg. drawing

  16. WATS D DIFFERENCE B/T INCLINATIONS AND PROJECTIONS

  17. really helpful ones are here

  18. these will help

  19. An 80 mm long line is parallel to and 30 mm above H.P. Its two ends are 15 mm and 40 mm in front of V.P. respectively. Draw its three views and find its inclination with the V.P. and P.P. Also find out its possible traces.
    If ny1 can give me its solution.. plzzz reply fast

  20. Exam is after 2 days, give tips for projection he line is incined to both planes.

  21. Exam is after 2 days, post tips or steps for projection of lines inclined to both planes.

  22. i am confused in hp & vp whenever i try to solved problem .what i do

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